Dr. Chodakiewicz continues European lecture circuit

As Dr. Marek Chodakiewicz continues his European lecture circuit and promoting his new book on post-communism, we are pleased to share the videos of some of his presentations below.

Dr. Chodakiewicz’s brief speech against the Polish inferiority complex in front of ca. 3,000 people at a Christian nationalist demonstration against government corruption:

Discussing his new book in Tczew, Poland:

In Tarnów, Poland:

In Nowa Huta, Poland:

In Warsaw, the capital of Poland (along with journalist Mr. Paweł Lisicki, historian Dr. Antoni Dudek, and political scientist Dr. Tomasz Żukowski):

In London:

New video recordings will be posted as they become available.

Independence Day and US support for Solidarity in Poland: A lecture by Prof. Marek Chodakiewicz

On July 4, 2014, Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz gave a lecture on the tradition of freedom in the US and Poland, the history of Independence Day in the United States, and support given to the Solidarity movement by Ronald Reagan’s administration.  The speech was given in Gdańsk, Poland, next to a monument of Saint John Paul II and President Ronald Reagan.

A video of lecture, recorded by TV Solidarność Gdańsk, can be found below.

Strategic Value of Poland and the Intermarium

The following article by Marek Jan Chodakiewicz was published by the Selous Foundation for Public Policy Research. The whole article can be found here.

STRATEGIC VALUE OF POLAND AND THE ‘INTERMARIUM’
The White House’s erratic, confused, and rudderless foreign policy endangers America’s Polish friend, and, indeed, other NATO members, putting Warsaw and the rest, in particular in Central and Eastern Europe, also known as the Intermarium, lands between the Black and Baltic seas, on a collision course vis-à-vis Berlin and Moscow. This is plainly obvious in the context of the Ukrainian crisis.

Gdańsk - Poland’s foreign minister Radek Sikorski is the latest foreign leader to pass a vote of no confidence on President Barack Obama’s conduct of international policy. Media reports almost completely missed this salient point focusing, instead, on the Polish official’s Hollywood-style profanity, which had been secretly recorded and leaked to the press. Under the current administration, the alliance with America “is worthless,” according to the Pole.

Sikorski, a staunch Transatlanticist, a reliable friend of America, former fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, and sometime roving correspondent for National Review, laments that, despite his nation’s bending over backwards, Washington has been an unreliable ally lately. The White House’s erratic, confused, and rudderless foreign policy endangers America’s Polish friend, and, indeed, other NATO members, putting Warsaw and the rest, in particular in Central and Eastern Europe, also known as the Intermarium, lands between the Black and Baltic seas, on a collision course vis-à-vis Berlin and Moscow. This is plainly obvious in the context of the Ukrainian crisis.

Sikorski’s cri de coeur has triggered some angry huffing and puffing among the globalized punditry. Aside from the usual “hate the U.S.” circles, in the European Union in particular, and the “I told you so” gleeful trolls of the Kremlin, America’s neo-isolationists and anarcho-capitalists have chimed in to skewer Poland’s foreign minister. Is America’s alliance worthless for Poland? Perhaps it is Poland that is worthless for the U.S., they charge. Their arguments boil down to this: What does Poland bring to the table? Nothing but trouble. It is a beneficiary of the thoughtless expansion of NATO with its Article 5 which obligates the U.S. to render Warsaw military assistance in case of an attack by an outside force. Admitting Poland and other post-Soviet countries to the alliance needlessly provoked Russia and exacerbated tensions between Moscow and Washington. America has really no national interest meddling in the post-Soviet zone. Too bad about poor Poland’s geopolitical location but that is really none of America’s business.

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Dr. Chodakiewicz interviewed by Polonia Christiana

Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz—who is currently on a lecture circuit promoting his new book in Poland—was interviewed on 3 July 2014 by the Polish web portal, Polonia Christiana (www.pch24.pl).

The main subjects of the interview were the assessment of the quarter-century of post-communist “transformation” in Poland, in general, and the quality of post-communist Poland’s political class, in particular. Dr. Chodakiewicz warned against hubristic and triumphalist celebrations of the “twenty-five years of freedom,” since the political system retains many continuities which still bind it to the communist People’s Republic. One example of the rather limited nature of the “change” in the past quarter-century is, Dr. Chodakiewicz points out, the funeral of Gen. Wojciech Jaruzelski, infamous for his crackdown (martial law) on the democratic opposition in 1981-1983, with full state and military honors. The nihilism and cynicism of the political establishment in Warsaw—recently highlighted by two highly embarrassing and vulgar recordings of top politicians—demonstrates just how much Sovietism remains in the country’s “post-Soviet” ruling caste.

On a positive note, Dr. Chodakiewicz emphasized that a movement for the regeneration of decent civilization is occurring in both Poland and the United States, although it may not be easy to spot at first. He is much more concerned about the future of Western Europe, which continues to view modernity and religion as two radically opposed and irreconcilable forces.

The full (Polish) text of the interview with Dr. Chodakiewicz is available here.

Bolesław Piasecki as the victim of post-modernist historical revisionism

SONY DSCAfter giving a lecture at the Kosciuszko Chair’s Fourth Annual Spring Symposium, Dr. Wojciech Jerzy Muszyński of the Institute of National Remembrance (IPN) in Warsaw, Poland, shared with the KC his paper entitled “Bolesław Piasecki as the victim of post-modernist historical revisionism.”

In the paper, he discusses Mikołaj S. Kunicki’s book entitled Between the Brown and the Red: Nationalism, Catholicism, and Communism In 20th-Century Poland – The Politics of Bolesław Piasecki (Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 2012).

An abstract of the paper is below, and the full paper can be found here: Muszynski, Boleslaw Piasecki as the victom of post-modernist historical revisionism

Abstract

In the following review, Dr. Wojciech J. Muszyński offers a critical analysis of Mikołaj Kunicki’s book on Bolesław Piasecki. As an iron pragmatic who began his political career as a nationalist radical, and ended it as a communist collaborator, Piasecki fascinates his ideological enemies to this day. Furthermore, they mirror image and reduce him to the role of the antithesis of what they themselves are: liberal or leftist ideologues, usually of an internationalist bent. It is a striking phenomenon that Bolesław Piasecki – a politician of secondary importance who never exerted a decisive influence on Polish history – became the subject of two ostensibly comprehensive biographies in English. This is all the more amazing, since Poland and the great personages in her history – with perhaps the exceptions of Pope John Paul II in the 1990s, and Lech Wałęsa – are generally not of much interest to Western historians. Piasecki, however, became the subject of an English-language biography well before his death in the form of Lucjan Blit’s The Eastern Pretender (1965). More recently, in 2012, he became the antagonist of a second work in English: Mikołaj Stanisław Kunicki’s Between the Brown and the Red: Nationalism, Catholicism, and Communism in 20th-Century Poland: The Politics of Bolesław Piasecki. Blit’s publication, however, was a political pamphlet, which the author never denied; just as he did not deny his open, fierce antipathy toward Piasecki. Kunicki’s biography, on the other hand, is presented as a work of objective scholarship. In essence, the latter represents efforts by post-modernist, neo-Stalinist academics to depict Polish nationalists as communist collaborators, which serves to whitewash Marxism by pinning much of the blame for the crimes of communism on “nationalism.”

* * *

Bolesław Piasecki, an iron pragmatic who began his political career as a radical nationalist, continues to fascinate his ideological foes to this day. It is quite astonishing that this admittedly second-rate politician who did not play any significant role in Polish history, has already been the subject of two quite substantial biographical publications in English. This is all the more astounding given that famous personages in the history of Poland have not attracted much interest on the part of Western historians, except perhaps for Pope John Paul II during the 1990s and Lech Wałęsa. Upon investigating the shelves of American and British book stores, it is difficult to find any books on important Poles. Piasecki, however, became the subject of an English-language biography many years before his death, i.e. Lucjan Blit’s The Eastern Pretender: The Story of Bolesław Piasecki, which was published in 1965. In 2012, another work appeared: Mikołaj Stanisław Kunicki’s Between the Brown and the Red: Nationalism, Catholicism, and Communism In 20th-Century Poland – The Politics of Bolesław Piasecki. But whereas Blit’s publication was a political pamphlet—which the author did not really disguise, nor did he deny his sharp antipathy towards Piasecki—Kunicki’s biography is presented as an objective work of scholarship.

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Transformacja czy niepodleglosc released in Poland

Marek Chodakiewicz’s new book entitled Trasnformacja czy niepodległość? was released at an event in Warsaw, Poland on June 12.  A video of the event can be found below.

The book, which assesses the past quarter-century of post-communism in Poland, can be purchased online here.

Transformacja czy niepodleglosc, June 12, Warsaw (7)

Transformacja czy niepodleglosc, June 12, Warsaw (6)

Transformacja czy niepodleglosc, June 12, Warsaw (5)

Transformacja czy niepodleglosc, June 12, Warsaw (4)

Transformacja czy niepodleglosc, June 12, Warsaw (1)

Natalie Grant and the Critical Importance of Understanding Disinformation

You are cordially invited to a lecture on the topic of

Natalie Grant and the Critical Importance of Understanding Disinformation

with
Paul A. Goble 
Former Senior Advisor to the Director, Voice of America
Adjunct Professor, IWP

Wednesday, September 17
2:00 PM

The Institute of World Politics
1521 16th Street NW
Washington, DC 20036

Register

Please contact sdwyer@iwp.edu with any questions.

This lecture is sponsored by the Kosciuszko Chair of Polish Studies.

K Chair Logo 2

No American contributed more to the understanding of disinformation than the late Natalie Grant. From her days as secretary to George Kennan at the Riga Legation in the 1920s to her years as an independent scholar in Washington, she explained the critical distinction between disinformation and propaganda and why those who work in international affairs must understand that, even though ferreting out disinformation is more challenging than identifying propaganda.

Paul Goble April 2013Paul Goble is a longtime specialist on ethnic and religious questions in Eurasia. Most recently, he was director of research and publications at the Azerbaijan Diplomatic Academy. Earlier, he served as vice dean for the social sciences and humanities at Audentes University in Tallinn and a senior research associate at the EuroCollege of the University of Tartu in Estonia. While there, he launched the “Window on Eurasia” series. Prior to joining the faculty there in 2004, he served in various capacities in the U.S. State Department, the Central Intelligence Agency and the International Broadcasting Bureau as well as at the Voice of America and Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty and at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He writes frequently on ethnic and religious issues and has edited five volumes on ethnicity and religion in the former Soviet space. Trained at Miami University in Ohio and the University of Chicago, he has been decorated by the governments of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania for his work in promoting Baltic independence and the withdrawal of Russian forces from those formerly occupied lands.

Mr. Goble’s blog can be found at: http://www.windowoneurasia.blogspot.com.