Anti-Communism and Counterintelligence: Interwar Poland

You are cordially invited to a special event on the topic of

Anti-Communism and Counterintelligence: Interwar Poland

Dr. Karol Sacewicz
will discuss
A Spy Joust: Poland and Lithuania in the interwar period

Dr. Tomasz Gajownik
will discuss
The Home Army and the Soviets: Polish strategic planning, 1941-1944 

Wednesday, September 24
2:00 PM

The Institute of World Politics
1521 16th Street NW
Washington, DC 20036
Parking Map

Register

Dr.Karol Sacewicz and Dr. Tomasz Gajownik are scholars affiliated with the Department of History and International Relations at the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland.

Please contact sdwyer@iwp.edu with any questions.

This lecture is sponsored by the Kosciuszko Chair of Polish Studies.

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Al-Jazeera quotes Prof. Chodakiewicz on Russia’s nuclear missile test

Dr. Marek Chodakiewicz, a professor of history and the current holder of The Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at IWP, was recently quoted by Al-Jazeera for his view on the U.S. administration’s response to Russia’s nuclear missile test.

The article quoted Dr. Chodakiewicz saying that the White House will downplay Russia’s recent actions because “to dwell too much on Putin’s brazen moves would underscore Obama’s impotence.” He argued that the Obama administration will likely ignore Putin’s aggressive nuclear tests in order to avoid appearing unsuccessful in past relations with Moscow.

Dr. Chodakiewicz also commented on U.S. sanctions on Russia, stating that they are more symbolic rather than actually effective and meaningful, which moreover suggests that Western economic sanctions will not desist due to the recent nuclear tests.

Please click here to read the article.

Greg Willey

Fourth annual Kosciuszko Chair Military Lecture commemorates the Warsaw Uprising

2014 marks the 70th anniversary of the tragic Warsaw Uprising. During this great feat of martial heroism, the Polish anti-Nazi, anti-Communist underground resistance fought the German occupiers of their homeland for sixty-three days — from 1 August to 3 October 1944. Predictably, the Soviet troops on the other side of the river Vistula stood by passively; Stalin hoped to destroy the Polish resistance with Nazi claws. The Western Allies did little more than airdrop some small arms and ammunition, most of which fell into German hands. As a result, the city of Warsaw was almost entirely destroyed, and a significant element of the Polish Home Army slaughtered. In addition, the Germans and their auxiliaries massacred approximately 200,000 civilians as they suppressed the uprising.

Yet, in spite of the toll and the defeat, the Poles generally celebrate the failed Warsaw Rising. In the fourth annual Kościuszko Chair Military Lecture, Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz explained this phenomenon.

In this lecture, given on September 11, 2014 and entitled “The 70th Anniversary of the Warsaw Uprising: Why the Poles Commemorate Defeat,” Dr. Chodakiewicz offered personal experiences along with historical facts in order to indicate that Poles do not solely celebrate defeat but rather, the spirit of freedom within the context of defeat.

- Pawel Styrna and Anjani Shah

Russian news agency mischaracterizes IWP professor’s lecture

The news agency, RIA Novosti, one of the largest in post-Soviet Russia, has quoted extensively Dr. Marek Chodakiewicz’s September 10 Intermarium Series lecture on Ukraine.

Although the Kościuszko Chair is generally always happy to see its lectures quoted in the media, it must be pointed out that the RIA Novosti piece was Muscovite disinformation. The lecture was open to all, but a RIA Novosti correspondent never identified himself/herself, nor did one interview Dr. Chodakiewicz.

Even more characteristically, RIA Novosti only mentioned selected, cut-and-pasted quotes taken out of context, thereby distorting Dr. Chodakiewicz’s arguments. The Russian correspondent intentionally picked out snippets to portray the Ukrainians as incompetent and the U.S. and its NATO allies as weak, indecisive, and, in general, not serious about defending Ukraine. In reality, Dr. Chodakiewicz’s criticism focused on the ineptness of Ukraine’s top-heavy post-Soviet military brass, not the rank and file troops.

To counter the post-Soviet disinformation, we are reposting Dr. Chodakiewicz’s advice, which we encourage RIA Novosti to quote in full:

What to do?

a)   Ukraine:

  • Secure and seal the border with Russia.
  • Seek provisional dual power in the Donbas (as opposed to evacuation or invasion).
  • Invite Western monitors, civilian and military (but not peacekeepers).
  • Purge the armed forces and security of the post-Soviets.
  • Hold no elections before asserting control over the entire country.

b)  The West:

  • Establish bases in the Baltics, Romania, Bulgaria, and Poland.
  • Arm Ukraine with conventional weapons.
  • Establish and boost satellite TV programs to beam the Western message into the post- Soviet zone, in particular in Russian.
  • Counter the Kremlin’s disinformation campaign in the West.
  • Freeze (gradually and selectively) all private and public assets of Russian origin in Western banks and financial institutions.
  • Supply Poland with enriched uranium for a nuclear device (like we did for Japan in the 1960s when China was at its most belligerent).
  • Supply Europe with gas and oil from the U.S.

The full lecture can be found below.

Prof. Marek Chodakiewicz discusses the current situation in Ukraine

Having explored the crisis-riven Central and Eastern European country in July, Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz shared his observations on the situation in post-Maidan Ukraine, including the eastern Donetsk region plagued by a Russian-supported irredentist insurgency and the area of the MH17 crash site, in a lecture at The Institute of World Politics on September 10, 2014.

This lecture, entitled “Ukraine: Summer’s Over,” was part of the Intermarium Lecture Series hosted by the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies.

70th Anniversary of the Warsaw Uprising: Why the Poles Commemorate Defeat

You are cordially invited to the fourth annual

Kościuszko Chair Military Lecture

on the topic of
The 70th Anniversary of the Warsaw Uprising: Why the Poles Commemorate Defeat

with
Dr. Marek Chodakiewicz
Professor of History, The Kościuszko Chair in Polish Studies

Thursday, September 11
12:30-3:30 PM

The Institute of World Politics
1521 16th Street NW
Washington, DC 20036
Parking map

Register

This lecture is sponsored by the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies.

K Chair Logo 2

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the tragic Warsaw Uprising. During this great feat of martial heroism, the Polish anti-Nazi, anti-Communist underground resistance fought the German occupiers of their homeland for sixty-three days — from 1 August to 3 October 1944. The goal was to rid the capital city of the Germans before the arrival of the Red Army. Predictably, the Soviet troops on the other side of the river Vistula stood by passively; Stalin hoped to destroy the Polish resistance with Nazi claws. The Western Allies did little more than airdrop some small arms and ammunition, most of which fell into German hands. As a result, the city of Warsaw was almost entirely destroyed, and a significant element of the Polish Home Army slaughtered. In addition, the Germans and their auxiliaries massacred approximately 200,000 civilians as they suppressed the uprising.

Yet, in spite of the toll and the defeat, the Poles generally celebrate the failed Warsaw Rising. In this year’s Kościuszko Chair Military Lecture, Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz will explain this phenomenon.

The lecture will be followed by a screening of the movie The August Sky: Sixty-Three Days of Glory [Sierpniowe niebo: 63 dni chwały], with English subtitles.