The 9th Annual Lady Blanka Rosenstiel Kościuszko Chair Spring Symposium

The Ninth Annual Lady Blanka Rosenstiel Kościuszko Chair Spring Symposium took place on April 6, 2019. Introduced by Dr. Marek Chodakiewicz, five lectures focused on the present situation in Central Europe followed by a more historical perspective on the region. Topics ranged from the Polish military under Tsarist Russia, Boris Smyslovski and his role in the Russian counterinsurgency and counterintelligence, the role of women in the Polish National Movement, the Polish involvement in the NKVD, and the backstage of INF Treaty implementation. Below, a short summary of the lectures is presented.

  1. For the Entente’s Cause in Tsarist Uniforms: Polish Military Formations in Tsarist Russia During WWI (1914-1918)

Dr. Wojciech Jerzy Muszyński, a scholar for the Institute of National Remembrance in Warsaw and the editor-in-chief of the semi-annual Glaukopis, discussed how Tsarist Russia utilized the Polish military during WWI. The Polish military were not allowed to use their own national symbols to represent their nation and wished to fight for their independence even though they were under Russian control. He further discussed how the Polish military under Russian control were fighting against the Polish under German control. The Polish military was also involved in the Bolshevik revolution and other internal struggles that the Russians had during WWI.

Click here to watch the lecture.

  1. Boris Smyslovski: WWII, White Russian, Counterinsurgency and Counterintelligence

Dr. Sebastian Bojemski, an independent scholar, discussed the life of Boris Smyslovski and his role during WWI and WWII. He fought for the Russian army in WWI, fought against the Bolsheviks, moved to Poland, but then was later recruited to be an army officer for the German military. He fought for the Germans in WWII against the Soviet Union and had his army elevated to the 1st Russian National Army. His whittled-down army settled in Liechtenstein, with some returning to the Soviet Union but never heard again, while others went to exile in Argentina. Smyslovski was able to offer his expertise and knowledge of the Soviet Union to the United States.

Click here to watch the lecture.

  1. Between Politics and Social Work: A Study of Women’s Activities within the Ranks of the Polish National Movement (1919-1939)

Dr. Jolanta Mysiakowska-Muszyńska, a scholar for the Institute of National Remembrance in Warsaw and a deputy editor-in-chief of the semi-annual Glaukopis, wrote a lecture that was presented by Ms. Maria Juczewska, the Associate Director of the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies. She discussed the role of women in the Polish National Movement during the Interwar Period and their contribution to the Polish women’s political enfranchisement. The Polish National Movement benefitted greatly from the support of women at the time, proposing a model of women’s liberation alternative to the one posited by the supporters of socialism.

Click here to watch the lecture.

  1. The Polish Operation of the NKVD: The Victim Tally

Dr. Tomasz Sommer, a Polish writer, journalist and publisher, and editor-in-chief of the weekly magazine Najwyższy CZAS!, discussed the numerical data provided by his research on the Polish Operation of the NKVD – an operation which was a systematic, large-scale extermination of the Poles in the U.S.S.R. between 1937-1938.

  1. The INF Treaty: Adventures in a Late Soviet-Era Town in the Urals

Mr. Charles Winkler, a retired Department of Defense civilian analyst with more than 30 years of experience, discussed his experiences related to the implementation of the INF Treaty, including the reality of late Soviet era in the Russian province as seen with the eyes of an American.

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