Category Archives: Articles

Christian Slaves, Muslim Masters

by Marek Jan Chodakiewicz  |  April 7, 2016  |  ARTICLES

Without the multicultural demographic and ideological context, the holy warriors of the Caliphate would stand out like proverbial sore thumbs in the Western world. Currently, they enjoy a perfect environment. They will not let up until Dar al Islam dominates the world. Or at least they will keep trying. The West should oppose that.

In war, power relationships reflect selflessness and bravery, but also feed on greed and compulsion. The bellicose synergy of the Muslim overlords and their Christian dependents reflected tactical alliances, personal considerations, mercenary motives, and brazen slavery. A typical leftist newsmaker of Indian parentage, the son of a tenured UN bureaucrat and a liberal academic at New York University, Ishaan Tharoor disagrees. According to him, Muslims and Christians killed each other, but most often they killed others jointly. Throughout history Muslims fought in Christian armies and vice versa. To talk about the clash of civilizations or defense of Christendom from Islam is therefore nonsense. This is the essence of Ishaan Tharoor’s belief, or, to be more precise, his enthusiastic endorsement of Ian Almond’s deeply flawed relativist and multiculturalist argument in Two Faiths, One Banner: When Muslims Marched With Christians Across Europe’s Battlegrounds (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009).

Click to read more.

Former Kosciuszko Chair intern interviewed on feminism by Polish weekly

Ms. Karolina Dobrowolska, a former intern of the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies (Fall 2013), was justinterviewed by the Polish Catholic weekly, Gość Niedzielny [The Sunday Guest]. Ms. Dobrowolska — who is a graduate of the University of Warsaw and an attorney at the “Ordo Iuris” Legal Institute — has co-organized, along with the female colleagues, a protest against the ratification of the Council of Europe’s Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence Against Women and Domestic Violence.

The reason behind this opposition is, as Ms. Dobrowolska explains, the highly-misleading name of the document which sounds very noble but is, in fact, a radical feminist (“genderist”) assault on the traditional family and gender roles. The primary claim of the “genderist” post-modernists — that gender is nothing more than a “social construct,” and therefore relative and subjective — is clearly a recipe for subverting the primary social unit that is the family. The resulting moral chaos, Ms. Dobrowolska argues, will render atomized and confused individuals easier to indoctrinate and manipulate.

She also challenged the assertions of feminists and other progressives who portray Poland as a land of widespread domestic violence and physical abuse of women. The reality, the young attorney points out, is that “according to the research done by the EU Agency of Basic Rights in the spring of 2014, violence against women in Poland is at a level of 19 percent, whereas in Denmark, where feminists dominate and have implemented measures based on the Convention, it is at 52 percent.”

The factor mitigating against domestic violence targeting women in Poland is the nation’s culture. The former KC intern continues: “Poland is a Catholic country with a highly-developed cult of the Virgin Mary, which, along with literary traditions evolving for centuries, has generated an atmosphere of respect for women.”

Cuba Libre

This piece by Marek Jan Chodakiewicz was published on the website of the American Thinker.

After a sustained effort in clandestine diplomacy, the White House has recognized Cuba. Yet, the Obama administration has failed to explain convincingly why, for Christmas, it has decided to bless a Communist totalitarian dictatorship, second only in ruthlessness to the North Korean satrapy.  Nonrecognition was a symbolic policy of our objection to the trampling of the island’s freedom. It was a powerful sign of our refusal to acquiesce in Cuba’s enslavement. True, we had no immediate plans to liberate the nation, but we morally condemned its Red slave masters.

The power of symbols in the policy of nonrecognition was palpable. Despite the fact that most of our allies, notably the EU and Canada, did business with Cuba, America stressed its exceptionalism for over half a century by refusing to treat the totalitarians as normal partners. Nonrecognition gave free Cubans at home and abroad hope that, first, the world’s leading power identified with their plight, and, second, that freedom was a universal norm that the United States would never compromise on. That policy is no more. The current administration has thus abandoned the moral high ground we occupied vis-à-vis the Castro regime following the betrayal of free Cubans at the Bay of Pigs by an earlier Democrat team in 1961.

Read more

Naming Names: An Op-Ed by Prof. Marek Chodakiewicz in Eurasia Review

“Islamofascists” and “Putin-Hitler” reverberate through our public discourse, reflecting anger and emotion, rather than calm and acumen. As such, these seemingly helpful tags actually impede our understanding of both adversaries and, hence, prevent us from elaborating a successful strategy against each, including mobilizing popular support for the endeavor.

He who gets to name names, wins. The old saw makes for a good zinger but lacks precision. It should perhaps be: he who labels a phenomenon fast and popularizes it persistently and repetitiously dominates the discourse. Hence, we suffer of the ever enduring poison of the Komintern’s Willi Műnzenberg who cast the Civil War in Spain as a conflict between “fascism” and “democracy.” Never mind that the former included Stalinists, Trotskyites, and anarchists whose revolutionary fury rendered anything smacking of democracy null and void. By pitting the putative “democrats” against alleged “fascists” maestro Műnzenberg supplied the West’s cackling liberal and leftist glitterati with an ultra-reductionist vision of Spain, where anyone rooting, as, for example, Evelyn Waugh was, for the conservative forces of law and order and against a Red revolution was instantaneously accused of worshiping Hitler, and thus ostracized and, more often than not, traumatized. This was deviously mischievous for it rendered any thoughtful analysis of the Spanish carnage utterly impossible. Hence, the West remained impotent in the face of the Hitler and Stalin aggression. And it missed another important lesson for the future. Műnzenberg built on a legacy of opprobrium attached to the generic concept “fascism.” Initially, the Communists considered Italian fascists as socially friendly, if confused revolutionaries. After Benito Mussolini’s black shirts crushed the Reds, Moscow changed its mind and unleashed an Exorcist-like stream of bile inundating anyone who opposed Stalin. Therefore not only the national socialists of Hitler became “fascists,” but so did the followers of Trotsky and anyone in between, including, for example, Christian nationalists. Labels tend to stick. Simplistic labels stick indefinitely.

Read more

Kosciuszko Chair Fellow discusses Russia’s information war

On December 11, Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies Fellow, Nathalie Vogel, published an article on the websiteThe Interpreter, which is “a daily-updated online journal dedicated primarily to translating media from the Russian press and blogosphere into English and reporting on events inside Russia and in countries directly impacted by Russia’s foreign policy.”

The article – entitled “In This Info-War, The Problem Is Not Only Russia” – quotes three IWP professors: Dr. John Lenczowski, Prof. Paul Goble, and Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz.   

Please click here to read the article.

Former intern publishes report on Polish intelligence

Mr. Bolesław Piasecki, a former intern of the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies at IWP, has just published a report on “Offensive Counterintelligence and the Challenges Facing the Polish Intelligence Services.”

The analysis — which was the product of Mr. Piasecki’s research and studies during his internship at the Institute of World Politics — was published by the Warsaw-based National Center for Strategic Studies (NCSS) and is available on the think-tank’s website.

Mr. Michael Preisler, Holocaust survivor: Pro Memoria

The Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies would like to pay homage to the memory of Mr. Michael Preisler (1919 – 2014), who passed away on September 29, 2014, in Richmond Hill, NY. Mr. Preisler was a Polish Christian survivor of the Auschwitz-Birkenau German death camp and, in 1982 – 1990, the president of the Downstate New York Division of the Polish American Congress.

Following the Nazi-Soviet invasion of Poland in September 1939, Mr. Preisler – who was only twenty at the time – joined Poland’s growing anti-German, anti-Communist underground. He was eventually caught by the Gestapo and shipped to the Auschwitz camp (in October 1941), which was initially built to facilitate the two occupiers’ plans for the destruction of the Polish elites. He spent almost four years incarcerated in the infamous and hellish extermination and forced labor camp. The fact that Mr. Preisler managed to avoid death could be seen as a “miracle,” particularly since he survived typhus (which reduced his weight to a meager 85 pounds) and the forced “evacuation” (i.e. death marches) from Auschwitz to Mauthausen and camps in Austria. He was convinced that only Divine intervention saved him. Afterwards, as a result of the Soviet occupation of Poland and other Central and Eastern European countries, Mr. Preisler chose freedom and remained in the West.

His traumatic experiences in Auschwitz and other German death camps persuaded Mr. Preisler to dedicate his life to educating the American public about the plight of Polish Christians – up to 3 million of whom perished – during the Second World War and simultaneously countering Holocaust revisionism. He believed that Nowhere else is Holocaust history as distorted and as misrepresented as it is about Poland.” To remedy this problem, he founded the Holocaust Documentation Committee and spoke about his ordeals at schools and other American organizations. As an Auschwitz survivor, he opposed the campaign to remove a cross – originally erected in a gravel pit by the camp site to commemorate the visit of Pope John Paul II – and to evict the Carmelite Nuns from a nearby convent. The Kościuszko Chair recognizes Mr. Michael Preisler’s efforts to propagate the historical truth about Poland.

During the 1980s – a time when the communist regime occupying Poland attempted to crush the Solidarity mass opposition movement – Mr. Preisler attempted to help his homeland by organizing pro-Solidarity demonstration in New York City and raising money to send clothing and medicine to the Polish people.

Mr. Preisler was buried at the cemetery of the Shrine of Our Lady of Częstochowa in Doylestown, PA.

To watch a short video of Mr. Preisler retelling his experiences, please click here.

To read Mr. Preisler’s testimony as a Holocaust survivor, please visit the website of the DC Division of the PAC.